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OSS Current Course on Campus

The Institute for the Science of Origins is excited to sponsor the Origins Science Scholars Program for the general public at Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

red-rectangle-join-us-button-hiDuring this unique program, members of the community engage with each other and with leading scholars of the origins sciences to investigate everything from the big bang to the developing mind and emerging life. Each evening begins with a presentation by a world-class researcher, followed by dinner and open discussion among all the participants.

We are excited to share unique and challenging perspectives and hope to leave participants better educated about origins research and the Institute for the Science of Origins.

We look forward to seeing you!

Click here to see videos of past OSS lectures!
Click here to register online
To register by phone: Call Felicia at 216-368-2090

Spring 2017 Program

.The seven-week program addresses new issues::

“Neutrinos”
“Alien Worlds and the Origin of Science”
“Extreme Evolution”
“Cutting-Edge Imaging Technology”

When: Apr 18, 2017 through May 30, 2017
Where: Sessions will be held on the campus of Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.
Schedule:       Tuesday evenings from 5:30-8 p.m.
5:30-6 p.m. – Coffee and cookies
6-7 p.m. – Lecture and Q&A
7-8 p.m. – Dinner and discussion

Lectures:

April 18: Glenn Starkman “Neutrino World”
 Director of the Institute for the Science of Origins and Professor of Physics, CWRU

neutrinos-720pxThis session will be held at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.
Neutrinos may be oddest of all the fundamental particles of nature. Almost a century after their prediction, and sixty years after they were first detected (by a future chair of the CWRU Physics department and his collaborators), we know that they come in three varieties (flavors) that change into one another as they travel through space, but we have yet to measure their masses or other important properties. We will learn what we do know about neutrinos and how we learned it, and highlight some of the most interesting remaining mysteries.

April 25:   Paul Butler “Alien Worlds and the Origin of Science”
Carnegie Institution of Washington

planetsThis session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center on the campus of Case Western Reserve University.
Over the past 20 years more than a thousand extrasolar planets have been found! Dr. Butler and his collaborators are building precise systems to survey the nearest stars and have found hundreds of planets, including 5 of the first 6 planets, the first saturn-mass planet, the first neptune-mass planet, the first terrestrial mass planet, and the first multiple planet system. In August 2016, they announced the discovery of a potentially habitable planet around the nearest star, Proxima Centauri. This discovery highlights the latest statistical evidence from Kepler and ground-based Doppler surveys that some 30% of stars have potentially habitable planets!

 

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May 2: Ben Monreal “The elusive neutrinos: 60 years of measuring the least interactive particle”
Professor of Physics, CWRU

sterile-neutrinoThis session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center on the campus of Case Western Reserve University
Neutrinos were first detected in 1956 coming out of a nuclear reactor at Savannah River, South Carolina, by Clyde Cowan and Fred Reines, soon thereafter chair of Physics at CWRU, who won the 1995 Nobel Prize for this discovery. Since then, we have discovered that there are three flavors of neutrino — electron, muon and tau. We have detected them coming from the sun, but only at half the rate we expected, and from a distant supernova, right here in Cleveland. We have learned that one flavor of neutrino can turn into another, a mixing phenomenon that strongly suggested very unexpectedly that they have mass. We have yet to detect that mass despite decades of trying, but a new technique may allow us to pin down the electron neutrino’s mass by very carefully measuring the neutrinos produced in the decay of tritium, the heaviest isotope of hydrogen.   Unless the cosmologists beat us to it.

May 9: Patricia Princehouse “Extreme Evolution”
Director of Outreach of ISO and Director of the Evolutionary Biology Program at CWRU

yeti-crab-kiwa-hirsutaThis session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center on the campus of Case Western Reserve University.
The polar seas are home to a stunning array of unusual animals with unique adaptations such as icefish whose blood contains an antifreeze solution they make within their bodies. Weird organisms eke out an existence deep within hot springs. How do such quirks, oddities and anomalies evolve? How can the blind process of natural selection produce such successful adaptations?

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May 16: Peter Faulhaber “Advanced Medical Imaging Technologies”
Professor of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University; Director, Clinical PET University Case Medical Center

faulhaberThis session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center on the campus of Case Western Reserve University.
Where once there were just X-rays, now there is a wide range of imaging technologies applicable to different tissues and different diagnostic purposes. In this session we will learn the latest about Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). There are even combined machines, such as PET/CT. What are they? How are they used, alone or in combinations in oncology, neurology and cardiology? What does the future hold for medical imaging?

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griswoldMay 23 Mark Griswold “Using Holograms to Change How We Look at the World”
 Director of the Interactive Commons and Professor of Radiology, CWRU


This session will be held at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.
Virtual reality has become interactive! New technologies such as the Microsoft HoloLens are allowing us to augment our daily experience of the world with holograms that add education, design and entertainment to our lives and work.

 

 

martens01sMay 30: Mike Martens “Where are the Magnets in Magnetic Resonance Imaging “
 Professor of Physics, CWRU

This session will be held at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.
The answer is both in the MRI machine and in your body! Learn about about the giant magnets in the MRI scanner, the tiny magnets in your body, and how they interact with each other to form the beautiful images we see today.

 

 

 

Many Thanks! 

The ISO Origins Science Scholars Program is presented in cooperation with Case Western Reserve University’s College of Arts and Sciences and The Laura and Alvin Siegal Lifelong Learning Program and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, and taped and broadcast in cooperation with CWRU’s MediaVision and IdeaStream.

 

Learn more:

For more information about the program, you can:
Download the Origins Science Scholars brochure

Click here to register online.
To register by phone: Call Lori at 216-368-4257 or Felicia at 216-368-2090

 

 

Page last modified: November 19, 2016