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OSS Current Course on Campus

The Institute for the Science of Origins is excited to sponsor the Origins Science Scholars Program for the general public at Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

red-rectangle-join-us-button-hiDuring this unique program, members of the community engage with each other and with leading scholars of the origins sciences to investigate everything from the big bang to the developing mind and emerging life. Each evening begins with a presentation by a world-class researcher, followed by dinner and open discussion among all the participants.

We are excited to share unique and challenging perspectives and hope to leave participants better educated about origins research and the Institute for the Science of Origins.

We look forward to seeing you!

Click here to see videos of past OSS lectures!
Click here to register online
To register by phone: Call Felicia at 216-368-2090

Fall 2017 Program

.The seven-week program addresses new issues::

“Smashing Particles”
“Climate Change Past and Present”
“The Mind-Body Connection”

When: Oct 24, 2017 through Dec 5, 2017
Where: Sessions will be held on the campus of Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.
Schedule:       Tuesday evenings from 5:30-8 p.m.
5:30-6 p.m. – Coffee and cookies
6-7 p.m. – Lecture and Q&A
7-8 p.m. – Dinner and discussion

Lectures:

 October 24: Glenn Starkman
What’s left to learn from particle accelerators?

 Director of the Institute for the Science of Origins and Professor of Physics, CWRU
This session will be held at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

For almost one hundred years, we have built ever larger particle accelerators in order to probe shorter and shorter distances with ever higher energy probes.  With the discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC, we have comepleted the Standard Model of particle physics.  What’s left to learn, and can we learn it from even bigger accelerators?

October 31:  Cyrus Taylor
Particle Detectors: Modern Cathedrals

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and Professor of Physics, CWRU

This session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center on the campus of Case Western Reserve University.

The detectors at modern particle accelerators are awe inspiring masterpieces of engineering weighing thousands of tons and requiring the coordinated effort of thousands of scientists and engineers at hundreds of universities and laboratories around the world.  How do they work, how are they designed, built and operated?

 

November 7: Mike Martens
Particle Accelerators: the world’s largest machines
Professor of Physics, CWRU


This session will be held 
at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History

Particle accelerators began almost a century ago as table-top apparatuses, and are now the world’s largest machines, tens of miles long, crossing international borders, requiring whole power plants to operate.

November 14: Darin Croft
“Climate Change Past and Present”
Professor of Anatomy, CWRU


This session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center on the campus of Case Western Reserve University.

What makes climate change today different from the major swings over the past 500 millions years? Are humans causing global climate change? Or is nature cycling the planet toward a heat wave, just as it has had periods of heat and ice ages in the recent and distant past?  The geologic record & earth dynamics explain the difference between the glacially slow climate change of the past vs today’s radically-accelerated changes. In fact, the mechanics of it are pretty simple. Geologists understand very well what makes the earth hot and cold -today, and throughout the history of the planet. And they know the effects climate change has had on the planet’s inhabitants: the most common response of species to major environmental change is extinction. Participants will come away with a better understanding of the science involved, quite apart from the thorny questions of policy. However, the good news is that newly-emerging markets are making huge gains in clean energy, which not only curbs pollution but simultaneously helps counter climate change. Solar panels and wind turbines are already providing thousands of new jobs in Ohio.

 

November 21: Michael Lewicki

“The Mind-Body Connection”

Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University

This session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center on the campus of Case Western Reserve University.
What is the connection between the mind and the physical body/brain? The brain’s interpretation of sensory info results in representation and understanding of the environment. Perception isn’t passive, it’s shaped by learning, memory, expectation, and attention.  It’s evolution is the subject of considerable controversy. Can theories of optimality explain the codes biological systems use?  Dr. Lewicki will argue that computational principles explain how neural codes are optimally adapted to their sensory environment.   Further, it is possible to extend these theories to provide functional theories for higher-level aspects of perception.

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November 28 Roberto F Galán
Making sense out of noise in neural circuits

Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University

This session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center on the campus of Case Western Reserve University.

Neural circuits are subject to sources of variability akin to static noise in electrical circuits. The speakers will present several examples from their research, showing that unlike man-made devices, neural circuits have adapted not only to cope with different levels of noise but also to take advantage of that intrinsic variability and uncertainty to encode information, modulate neuronal activity, and transform behavior.

 

 


December 5: Howard Eichenbaum
Memory: How the brain maps memories in space and time”
Professor of Psychology, NYU

This session will be held at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.
Our memories define who we are. How memories are represented in the brain has long interested scientists, and recently this has intensified as several labs have taken advantage of sophisticated new tools to make important inroads into finding and manipulating neuronal components of a single engram, or memory trace. However, important questions remain. Episodic memories (i.e. events) include the “what,” “where,” and “when” of an experience, yet the “when” component has largely been neglected. Dr Eichenbaum will discuss his new findings on the neurobiological basis of memory that includes this overlooked temporal dimension, how he discovered how temporally-related events are encoded in hippocampal engrams, and the neural mechanisms that integrate memories across time. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many Thanks! 

The ISO Origins Science Scholars Program is presented in cooperation with Case Western Reserve University’s College of Arts and Sciences and The Laura and Alvin Siegal Lifelong Learning Program and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, and taped and broadcast in cooperation with CWRU’s MediaVision and IdeaStream.

 

Learn more:

For more information about the program, you can:
Download the Origins Science Scholars brochure

Click here to register online.
To register by phone: Call Lori at 216-368-4257 or Felicia at 216-368-2090

 

 

Page last modified: July 10, 2017