The Institute for the Science of Origins is excited to sponsor the Origins Science Scholars Program for the general public at Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

red-rectangle-join-us-button-hiDuring this unique program, members of the community engage with each other and with leading scholars of the origins sciences to investigate everything from the big bang to the developing mind and emerging life. Each evening begins with a presentation by a world-class researcher, followed by dinner and open discussion among all the participants.

We are excited to share unique and challenging perspectives and hope to leave participants better educated about origins research and the Institute for the Science of Origins.

We look forward to seeing you!

Click here to see videos of past OSS lectures!
Click here to register online
To register by phone: Call Felicia at 216-368-2090

Spring 2021 Program

.The seven-week program addresses::

Black Holes
Implications of Recent Nobels in Chemistry and Biomedicine
Climate Change

 

When: Apr 20, 2021 through June 1, 2021
Where: ONLINE! (access info provided with registration)
n.b. Sessions usually take place on the campus of Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, but this semester all will be online for a nominal fee. Also check out the free online talks in our “Life, the Universe and Hot Dogs” series! 

Schedule:
Tuesday evenings
Lectures begin at 6pm, followed by Q&A and discussion
(n.b. Our in-person evenings include dinner but due to current circumstances, we can’t eat together this semester. However, we encourage you to order in a meal from one of the great University Circle restaurants or one of your own local favorites and enjoy it at leisure while listening to our speakers!)

Lectures:


April 20


Juan Maldecena

Carl Feinberg Professor, School of Natural Sciences, Theoretical Physics, Institute for Advanced Study

“Black holes, Hawking radiation, and the structure of spacetime
This session will be held online.


Apr 27


Dimitrios Psaltis

University of Arizona

“The First Picture of a Black Hole”

This session will be held online.

 

May 4


Janna Levin

Barnard College

“The Black Hole Survival Guide”
This session will be held online

 

 

May 11


Blanton Tolbert

Case Western Reserve University

“The CRISPR/Cas system: Implications for basic science and beyond”

This session will be held online
Presented in collaboration with CWRU’s Emeriti Academy.

Research in the Tolbert Group endeavors to understand the molecular mechanisms RNA viruses use to express their genomes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and other solution biophysical methods are used to determine 3D structures and physiochemical properties of viral RNA regulatory elements both free and bound to their cognate host proteins. Their primary focus has been to understand how the HIV regulates RNA processing events, with other projects including the molecular mechanisms of Enterovirus 71 (EV71), the etiological agent of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease. For this talk Dr. Tolbert will explain the intricacies of the CRISPR/Cas 9 system.


May 18


Joe LaManna

Case Western Reserve University

Living with oxygen: How genes are regulated in response to changes in oxygen availability”

Presented in collaboration with CWRU’s Emeriti Academy.
This session will be held online

 

May 25

Cyrus Taylor & Chris Haufe

Case Western Reserve University

Climate Change: What do we know and how do we know it?”

Presented in collaboration with CWRU’s Emeriti Academy.
This session will be held online

 

June 1

Beverly Saylor & Joe Ortiz

Case Western Reserve University
& Kent State University

Lake Erie hydroclimate over the last 10,000 years

Presented in collaboration with CWRU’s Emeriti Academy.
This session will be held online

 

 

Postponed til Fall 2021:

Katie Hinde, Arizona State University  “Mother’s Milk & the Evolving Microbiome

Katie Hinde is studying breast milk’s status as the first superfood, providing babies with invaluable microbes custom-tailored to their individual needs, via an incredible and unlikely dialogue between the mother’s enzymes and the baby’s saliva. Mother’s milk is older than dinosaurs. Interestingly, the biological recipe of milk differs between sons and daughters. Breast milk is food and medicine and is the message that organizes a baby’s brain, body and behavior. Milk has been shaped by hundreds of millions of years of natural selection. As scientists decode the mysteries of milk and its evolution, we gain essential new tools for human health and well-being.

Many Thanks! 

The ISO Origins Science Scholars Program is presented in cooperation with Case Western Reserve University’s College of Arts and Sciences and The Laura and Alvin Siegal Lifelong Learning Program and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, and taped and broadcast in cooperation with CWRU’s MediaVision and IdeaStream.

 

Learn more:

For more information about the program, you can:
Download the Origins Science Scholars brochure

Click here to register online.
To register by phone: Call Felicia at 216-368-2090

CWRU Students:
If you’d like to sign up for a chance to attend the lecture and dinner on one of the above dates, please follow this link