The Institute for the Science of Origins is excited to sponsor the Origins Science Scholars Program for the general public at Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

red-rectangle-join-us-button-hiDuring this unique program, members of the community engage with each other and with leading scholars of the origins sciences to investigate everything from the big bang to the developing mind and emerging life. Each evening begins with a presentation by a world-class researcher, followed by dinner and open discussion among all the participants.

We are excited to share unique and challenging perspectives and hope to leave participants better educated about origins research and the Institute for the Science of Origins.

We look forward to seeing you!

Click here to see videos of past OSS lectures!
Click here to register online
To register by phone: Call Felicia at 216-368-2090

Fall 2021 Program

.The seven-week program addresses::

New Light on Dark Matter?
Human Origins in East Africa
New Questions About Our Solar System and Planets

 

When: Sept 28, 2021 through Nov 9, 2021
Where: In person, on campus!
n.b. Sessions traditionally take place on the campus of Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, but this semester virtual attendance will be the exclusive means to attend.

Schedule:
Tuesday evenings
Lectures begin at 6pm, followed by Q&A and discussion

Lectures:

September 28


The Elusive Nature of Dark Matter

Glenn Starkman

Professor of Physics and of Astronomy, Director of the Institute for the Science of Origins, CWRU
Tuesday, September 28
Tinkham Veale University Center (Ballrooms A/B)
This session will be held in the Tinkham Veale University Center, on the campus of CWRU.


October 5


Dark Matter and the Milky Way”

Nathaniel Starkman

Department of Astronomy, University of Toronto
Tuesday, Oct 5
Tinkham Veale University Center (Ballrooms A/B)
This session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center, on the campus of CWRU.

 

October 12


Kenya’s Rich Evidence for Human Origins:
Past, Present and Future”

Isaiah Nengo

 

Research Professor, Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University
Associate Director, Turkana Basin Institute
Tuesday, October 12
Tinkham Veale University Center (Ballrooms A/B)
This session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center, on the campus of CWRU.

 

October 19


“Ethnobotany in southwest Ethiopia: How today’s people-plant relationships help us understand the story of domestication.”

Elisabeth Hildebrandt

Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University
Tuesday, October 19
Tinkham Veale University Center (Ballrooms A/B)
This session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center, on the campus of CWRU.

 

October 26


Climate, Tectonics and Landscape: Disentangling Influences on Human Evolution

Beverly Saylor

Armington Professor, Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, CWRU
Tuesday, October 26
Tinkham Veale University Center (Ballrooms A/B)
This session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center, on the campus of CWRU.


November 2


The Solar System’s Adolescent Years: How the Solar System Changed After the Planets Formed”

Nathan Kaib

Assistant Professor, Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma
Tuesday, November 2
Tinkham Veale University Center (Ballrooms A/B)
Presented in collaboration with CWRU’s Emeriti Academy.
This session will be held in the Tinkham Veale Center, on the campus of CWRU.


November 9


Inferring the Properties of Planet 9 (If It Exists)

Nathan Kaib

Assistant Professor, Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy
The University of Oklahoma

 

Tuesday, November 9
Presented in collaboration with CWRU’s Emeriti Academy.
This session will be held in March Auditorium, Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

 

 

Postponed til Spring 2022:

Katie Hinde, Arizona State University  “Mother’s Milk & the Evolving Microbiome

Katie Hinde is studying breast milk’s status as the first superfood, providing babies with invaluable microbes custom-tailored to their individual needs, via an incredible and unlikely dialogue between the mother’s enzymes and the baby’s saliva. Mother’s milk is older than dinosaurs. Interestingly, the biological recipe of milk differs between sons and daughters. Breast milk is food and medicine and is the message that organizes a baby’s brain, body and behavior. Milk has been shaped by hundreds of millions of years of natural selection. As scientists decode the mysteries of milk and its evolution, we gain essential new tools for human health and well-being.

Many Thanks! 

The ISO Origins Science Scholars Program is presented in cooperation with Case Western Reserve University’s College of Arts and Sciences and The Laura and Alvin Siegal Lifelong Learning Program and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, and taped and broadcast in cooperation with CWRU’s MediaVision and IdeaStream.

Click here to register online.
To register by phone: Call Felicia at 216-368-2090

CWRU Students:
If you’d like to sign up for a chance to attend the lecture and dinner on one of the above dates, please follow this link